2019 Society for Historical Archaeology Conference - CRMArch 155

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The Society for Historical Archaeology conference was held in St. Charles, Missouri this year (2019) and despite the 15 inches of snow, the government shutdown, and a fire in the terminal at St. Louis International, the conference went pretty well! Bill White and Chris Webster sit down with two women that started a Facebook group to be a safe place for people that are victims of the #metoo phenomenon and the talk to each other about other things they saw at the conference.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Technology - Heritage Voices 25

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts a panel on technology in the Heritage/Cultural Resource Management fields. Panelists include Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs, Emily Van Alst (Sihasapa Lakota descent), a PhD student at Indiana University, and Briece Edwards, Manager of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde. The panelists discuss how they use technology in their work, the positives and negatives of technology for tribes and heritage preservation, and tribes and Indigenous Archaeologist’s innovative adaptations of technology to serve their needs. They shared some especially exciting ways they are using technology to share information back to the communities they work with and as non-invasive or destructive alternatives.

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Can Your ClipBoard Do That? - TAS 55

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Today play another episode of the live-on-Facebook show ‚ÄúYou Call This Archaeology‚ÄĚ with Chris Webster and Richie Cruz. We talk about contract archaeology, wireless chargers, Megan Fox, and the digital archaeology transition, among other things. Get notified when we go live on Facebook by liking the page!

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Using Drones for Survey with Kyle Olson - ArchaeoTech 96

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We talk about drones a lot on this show. And for the record, they're officially called UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) or UASs (Unmanned Aerial Systems). What we don't often talk about is the nuts and bolts of actually using a UAV in the field.

Today we have a guest, Kyle Olson, who was on a team that used a DJI Mavic Pro to conduct aerial survey and mapping in central Asia. But, the article doesn't necessarily talk about the results of the survey. They instead talk about HOW they did the survey and what worked and what didn't. That's what we need more of.

So, take a listen and give us your feedback.

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Working Ourselves and the Industry Out of Work - CRMArch 154

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Whether we're talking about a single archaeology project or the industry as a whole, we're always worried about working ourselves out of work. What does that mean? Well, we talk about it on today's episode. To help counter this, though, check out our sponsors, Wildnote and Team Black.

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Cow-abunga! - Animals 06

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Cattle domestication

Modern domestic cattle descends from the aurochs (Bos primigenius). The dynamics of aurochs domestication is, as always when domestication is concerned, not well understood as of yet. They were supposedly domesticated in SW Asia some 8,000 years BP.

How do we identify cattle bones?

Cattle bones are usually identified by their large size (compared to most animals encountered within archaeological assemblages) and a number of morphological features which distinguish them from other large mammals, such as horse and red deer (C. elaphus). The latter are in fact often mistaken for cows, the reason for this being threefold. Firstly, the fragmented nature of archaeological remains and a bias towards cattle ID (due to their higher frequency when compared to deer) means red deer elements are sometimes identified as cattle. Secondly, prehistoric cattle was smaller than their modern counterparts, making it easier to confuse their remains with those of red deer. When complete specimens are present, the morphological differences between cattle, horse and red deer are however easily distinguishable.

What do cattle remains often indicate in an assemblage?

They can provide inference on the economy of the settlement (e.g. meat or dairy production), although it is important to remember that in the past many settlements probably had a somewhat mixed economy. This is usually carried out by analyzing the age profiles of your assemblage.

Cattle remains may be able to offer insight on the culture of a particular settlement. For instance, in Britain, more romanized sites are likely to have a higher number of cattle within their assemblages. A high number of cattle remains are sometimes also indicative of a military site.

THAT BIG COW MEME

https://eu.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2018/11/27/australia-cattle-knickers-steer-giant-internet-twitter-holstein-friesian/2125889002/

Fig. 1.    Iron Age Cow Skull with Pole Axe Damage.

Fig. 1. Iron Age Cow Skull with Pole Axe Damage.

Further Reading

  • Bloody Slaughter: Ritual Decapitation and Display At the Viking Settlement of Hofsta√įir, Iceland

  • Morris, J. (2011) Investigating Animal Burials: Ritual, mundane and beyond

    • BAR British Series 535

  • -Hillson, S. (1992) Mammal Bones and Teeth: An Introductory Guide to Methods of Identification

    • London: University College London Institute of Archaeology

  • O‚ÄôConnor, T. & Sykes, N. (Eds.) (2010) Extinctions and Invasions: A Social History of British Fauna

    • Windgather Press

  • Fagan, B. (2015) The Intimate Bond: How animals shaped human history

    • London: Bloomsbury Press

  • Toynbee, J.M.C. (2013) Animals in Roman Life & Art

    • Barnsley: Pen & Sword

  • Merrifield, R. (1987) The Archaeology of Ritual and Magic

    • London: Guild Publishing London

  • Van Grouw, K. (2018) Unnatural Selection

    • Oxfordshire: Princeton University Press

  • Knickers (2018) Knickers, the magical Australian steer

    • Cleavers Press

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Megan Fox Teaches Archaeology - TAS 54

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So, Megan Fox likes archaeology and wants to tell us all about it. Well, our host Chris Webster has a few things to say about that. They're, surprisingly, not all bad. Check out the show if you haven't - it won't be on for long.

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Implementing a Tablet-Based Recording System for Ceramic Classification - ArchaeoTech 95

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Many people are writing papers about "going digital" and the results from doing so. However, not too many are writing about the effects of going digital on a crew. For example, do people work better together or separately when recording artifacts with a tablet. On today's episode we talk to the authors of a paper about going digital on a project in Peru and how recording ceramics was changed by using tablets.

Links

  • Mobilization as Mediation: Implementing a Tablet-Based Recording System for Ceramic Classification, Parker VanValkenburgh, Luiza O. G. Silva, Chiara Repetti-Ludlow, Jake Gardner, Jackson Crook, and Brian Ballsun-Stanton

    • DOI:

      10.1017/aap.2018.12

    • Advances in Archaeological Practice 6(4), 2018, pp. 342-356

  • FAIMS

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Megan Fox, Pseudo-Archaeology, and AI: Thanks 2018 - CRMArch 153

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Well, 2018 is coming to a close and it’s given us some real gems to consider. Aside from ACTRESS Megan Fox thinking she knows anything about archaeology we also have rogue robots and out-of-control AI. But there were some good things this year. Join Chris, Bill, and Bill for this 2018 wrap-up.

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Museums, Representation, and Intersectionality - HeVo 24

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On today’s podcast we have Brandon Castle, a Senior in Fort Lewis College’s Anthropology Department, who has also worked at the Totem Heritage Center in Alaska, the Center of Southwest Studies in Colorado, the Field Museum of Natural History in Illinois, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He also discusses his work for Fort Lewis College’s Gender and Sexuality Resource Center. Brandon shares ideas on improving representation, intersectionality, collaboration, and the creation of safe spaces in anthropology and museums. We additionally talk about stereotyping and appropriation, including totems and two-spirit identities. Finally we take on how you experience identity differently in different settings and the balance between cultural relativism and pushing for culture change.

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Radio Killed the Podcast Star - TAS 53

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On Friday, Dec. 7th, 2018 Chris took this show on the radio. He’s doing a new show every Friday from 12pm to 1pm PST. Unfortunately the equipment that normally records the live broadcast went down before the show and no one noticed. So, Richie Cruz joined us again to talk about the show and some other things in a Facebook Live episode of You Call This Archaeology.

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  • Find the radio show here: KNVC

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Heritage Chat Bots (To Bot or Not?) - ArchaeoTech 94

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Chat bots are taking over conversations with customer service and social media applications like Facebook Messenger. But, do they belong in heritage situations? Can chat bots help outreach and interact with the public or are they just one more distraction? We talk about chat bots in the context of a recent article from the Society for American Archaeology’s Advances in Archaeological Practice on this episode.

Links

  • ‚ÄúCan Heritage Bots Thrive? Toward Future Engagement in Cultural Heritage‚ÄĚ - Angeliki Tzouganatou

    • DOI: 10.1017/aap.2018.32

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Historical Archaeology with Dr. Bill White - CRMArch 152

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Dr. Bill White, long-time host of this show, talks to us about historical archaeology. What is historical archaeology? When does it start in the United States? When does it end? What are some of the biggest questions in historic archaeology? Also, what's going historic in 2019 as a result of the 50-year-rule. These questions and more on the 152nd running of the CRM Archaeology Podcast.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Cryptozoology (featuring Archaeological Fantasies) - Ep 05

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Today's show is a crossover special with archaeology podcast "Archaeological Fantasies"!

Cryptids are creatures from fiction, folklore, and fantasy. There have been many alleged cases of "zooarchaeological evidence" to prove the existence of certain imaginary creatures, but most of these tend to be poorly identified real animal remains. Of course, there are some instances of intentional hoaxes, where creative manipulation and taxidermy have been used to create fake evidence (see: PT Barnum and other roadside attractions).

Further Reading

- https://animalarchaeology.com/2018/11/19/troweling-theme-parks-creating-cryptozoological-remains-in-expedition-everest/

- Loxton, D. and Prothero, D.R. (2013) Abominable Science: Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids. Columbia University Press.

- http://www.thecarpetbagger.org/2013/01/straight-out-of-fiji-merman.html

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You Call This Archaeology?!?! - TAS 52

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Here is the recording of a live show we do on Facebook at the ArchPodNet page. Richie Cruz is the co-host and we talk about a variety of things loosely tied to archaeology. And I mean loosely.

Also, don't forget to check out Chris' new radio show starting Dec. 7, 2018 at 12pm PST on knvc.org.

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Disaster Preparedness for Archaeological Sites - ArchaeoTech 93

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Disaster preparedness takes many forms - depending on who you are and what you do. It's also important for archaeology sites. Creating relationships with major and local agencies and locating archaeology sites in jeopardy is paramount to preserving history. When disaster strikes we should be ready to respond or have recorded as much as possible already.

On today's show we talk about an article in the November 2018 issue of the SAA's Advances in Archaeological Practice that tackles these issues.

Links

  • ‚ÄúFinding the Negative in the Positive: Archaeology and Data Collection in the Face of Natural Disasters‚ÄĚ - Tanya M. Peres and Aaron Deter-Wolf

    • DOI:

      10.1017/aap.2018.29

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Drone Giveaway!

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You Call This Archaeology? - CRMArch 150

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Every so often Chris Webster and Richie Cruz, both archaeologists, broadcast live on the APN Facebook page. It's a show called "You Call This Archaeology?" We talk about archaeology and many other things. Instead of our normal show we bring you the 49th recording of YCTA. Enjoy, and, like our Facebook page so you'll know when we go live again.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Salish-Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation Program - HeVo 23

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On today’s podcast we have Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs. We talk about the blending of ethnography and archaeology within indigenous archaeology, as well as the identity challenges that many young Native Americans face and how indigenous archaeology can be one part of a holistic picture that can give young people a sense of who they are and hope for the future. He shares his experience working with National Geographic as one example of how photography and archaeology can reinstill that sense of identity.

‚ÄúThe application of oral histories to archaeology is at the forefront of the research, at no point is the narrative of tribal people secondary. This methodology is the foundation of our work. No longer should Indian people be delegated to the appendices. No longer are we ‚Äėsupplemental‚Äô humans‚ÄĚ.

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Disappearing Data with Keith Kintigh - ArchaeoTech 92

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On episode 91 of this podcast Paul and Chris talked about a recent article that discussed the "disappearing data" of archaeology. Where do data go when the project is over? Why isn't the government doing a better job of preserving the data?

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Leadership with Author Vishal Agarwal - CRMArch 149

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Almost everyone will admit that leadership training and practices are badly needed, and are in fact missing, within Cultural Resource Management. We need all the help we can get! Vishal Agarwal, author of ‚ÄúGive to Get‚ÄĚ talks to us about leadership and navigating through work environments.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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