Salish-Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation Program - HeVo 23

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On today’s podcast we have Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs. We talk about the blending of ethnography and archaeology within indigenous archaeology, as well as the identity challenges that many young Native Americans face and how indigenous archaeology can be one part of a holistic picture that can give young people a sense of who they are and hope for the future. He shares his experience working with National Geographic as one example of how photography and archaeology can reinstill that sense of identity.

“The application of oral histories to archaeology is at the forefront of the research, at no point is the narrative of tribal people secondary. This methodology is the foundation of our work. No longer should Indian people be delegated to the appendices. No longer are we ‘supplemental’ humans”.

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Disappearing Data with Keith Kintigh - ArchaeoTech 92

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On episode 91 of this podcast Paul and Chris talked about a recent article that discussed the "disappearing data" of archaeology. Where do data go when the project is over? Why isn't the government doing a better job of preserving the data?

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Leadership with Author Vishal Agarwal - CRMArch 149

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Almost everyone will admit that leadership training and practices are badly needed, and are in fact missing, within Cultural Resource Management. We need all the help we can get! Vishal Agarwal, author of “Give to Get” talks to us about leadership and navigating through work environments.

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Sheep vs Goats - Animals 04

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Sheep are the domesticated form of the mouflon (Ovis orientalis), which was domesticated around 11,000-9,000 BC and represents one of the earliest instances of domestication after dogs. As with all domestications, it is important to keep in mind that this was most likely not a single event, rather several attempts taking place in different locations and time periods.

Sheep husbandry quickly spread across Europe from the Near East. Up until the Iron Age, sheep would have largely been small, short tailed and varied in colour.

Goats were most likely domesticated in South West Asia, possible South East Europe. They are hardy and versatile animals which require relatively little care. Primitive goats would have had coarse hair and large horns. One such example is the present day British Primitive Goat, a rare breed now limited to few feral herds and captive individuals.

Sheep were a staple domesticate and, as such, used for a variety of products. In antiquity, wool was generally one of the most important products deriving from sheep farming. Goats would have also been kept for their hair and skins. Milk and meat would have also been important to different extents, and we can gage such extent based on what we recover archaeologically. Based on the kill off pattern of the specimens recovered within our assemblage, we can in fact argue what products sheep and goats would have been likely kept for. For instance, a high percentage of culled juvenile males suggest a milk-based economy

Sheep and goat are both Caprinae, and as such they will have uncannily similar morphological characteristics. The two can actually hybridise but this will inevitably result in infertile offspring, known as sheep/goat hybrids or geep. Telling the two species apart in the archaeological record is a task that requires outstanding observational skills and plenty of practice, and has been the focus of intensive research in recent years. Separating the two species is important as they will provide different information about the economy and environment they were part of.

A by no means exhaustive list of how to distinguish between sheep and goat bones is provided below:

1) Horns: Sheep horns tend to be parallel while goat horns are more divergent.

2) Teeth: In sheep, the third cusp of the third molar presents a small lip, while the third premolars appears square in sheep and triangular in goat.

3) Other diagnostic postcranial elements include the astragalus, distal humerus, calcaneum and metapodials.

Guest Interview: Albína Hulda Pálsdóttir

Find out more about our guest and her projects

Reference collection: https://www.icelandiczooarch.is/

Project website: https://www.mn.uio.no/cees/english/research/projects/690456/index.html

Follow Albina on twitter: https://twitter.com/AlbinaIcelander

Further Reading

  • Seder, M. , Latham, H. (2010) ‘Assessing the reliability of criteria used to identify postcranial bones in sheep, Ovis, and goats, Capra’

  • Journal of Archaeological Science (2010) 1-19

  • Crabtree, Pam J. 1995 The symbolic role of animals in Anglo-Saxon England: Evidence from burials and cremations. In The Symbolic Role of Animals in Archaeology. K. Ryan and P. J. Crabtree, eds. Pp. 20-6. MASCA Research Papers in Science and Archaeology. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, University Museum

  • Russel, N. (2012) Social Zooarchaeology: Humans and Animals in Prehistory

  • Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

  • King, A. (1978) A Comparative Survey of Bone Assemblages from Roman Sites in Britain. Institute of Archaeology - London 15

  • Salvagno, L. And Albarella, U. (2017) ‘A morphometric system to distinguish sheep and goat postcranial bones’. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178543.

  • https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0178543

  • Fagan, B. (2015) The Intimate Bond: How animals shaped human history

  • London: Bloomsbury Press

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Studying Human Evolution without the Humans - Archaeology 51

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Can you study human evolution without looking at humans or human ancestors specifically? Our guest on this show is doing just that. By studying old world monkeys in the fossil record, ASU graduate student Irene Smail is learning about how humans and monkeys ate and lived on the African landscape.

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Disappearing Data - ArchaeoTech 91

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What happens to archaeological data when the project is over? Are we doing all we can? Where does it go and how can we help? This is a response to a recent article.

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CRM Archaeology, The Lovecraft Edition - CRMArch 148

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H.P. Lovecraft wrote many stories. I bet he never thought about archaeology while he was writing them. Well, we did. Here's another random encounters episode where we roll the dice and pair archaeology with horror. It'll be a wild ride where we talk about field stories, racism, and more.

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The Earliest North Americans with Dr. David Kilby - TAS 50

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The people known to archaeologists as "Clovis" were widely thought to be the first people to migrate to North America. Where did they come from and how did they get here? Also, when did they get here? These questions remain unanswered in North American Prehistory but we're getting a lot closer. Dr. David Kilby joins us to talk theories and some of the latest evidence.

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Lincoln Harschlip - Profiles 76

Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?

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So You Want To Be A Drone Pilot? - ArchaeoTech 90

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Drones are fast becoming a standard archaeological tool. Their cool factor is undeniable, but maybe you're on the fence about their actual utility. Or, maybe you're sold on their usefulness and want to jump in but don't know where to start. In today's episode of the ArchaeoTech Podcast, we'll help get you up to speed.

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Greater Chaco Landscape - Heritage Voices 22

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On today’s podcast we are hugely honored to have three special guests who spoke with Jessica about the Greater Chaco Landscape during their advocacy trip to Washington D.C. The first segment features All Pueblo Council of Governors (APCG) Chairman Edward Paul Torres and former Governor of the Pueblo of Tesuque and co-chair of the APCG’s Natural Resources Committee, Mark Mitchell. In the second segment we have Keegan King, an advocate for the Greater Chaco Landscape from the Pueblo of Acoma. They speak about what Chaco means to them as individuals and to their Pueblos, how they would like to see the area managed, their local and national advocacy efforts, collaborating with the Navajo Nation on these efforts, and appropriate behavior at places like Chaco Canyon. Finally we talk about, what they would like to see in tribal consultation in general and specifically how you can support their efforts to protect the Greater Chaco Landscape.

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Micah Smith - Profiles 75

Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?

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Is CRM Ready for Synthesis? - CRMArch 147

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Sarah Herr joins us to discuss synthesis in CRM and the Coalition for Archaeological Synthesis.

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A 5000 Year Old Burial Site in Kenya with Elizabeth Sawchuk - TAS 49

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5000 years ago pastoralists in Kenya created a burial site with a specific plan. For at least the next 400 years, possibly as long as 800 years, over 500 people of all ages and classes were buried with amazing precision and care. With no system of writing it's unclear how they accomplished this. Dr. Elizabeth Sawchuk, one of the researchers on the project, gives us some insight into life around Lake Turkana 5000 years ago and about the people buried there.

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What's New in Apple : Sept 2018 - ArchaeoTech 89

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Apple had their usual September announcement recently and Paul and Chris break down what the new tech is and what it means for archaeology. Should you upgrade to the new phone? Do you need the new watch? Will the new operating system crash your hard drive? We'll talk about all that and our experiences with iOS 12, Watch OS 5, and MacOS Mohave, 10.14.

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Who Let The Dogs Out? Animals 03

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The skeletal remains of dogs are simultaneously very distinct in their characteristics, but also very similar to other animals. Compare a dog skull to grey seals or foxes to see what we mean!

Dogs seem to have had a special relationship with humans - this can be observed in some burial and ritual rites involving dog remains. There is currently a lot of interesting research happening that combines aDNA (ancient DNA) analysis with zooarchaeology to better understand human-dog relations and the domestication of the dog over time.

Due to breeding techniques, the skulls of certain modern dogs have been transformed beyond recognition - if you're brave enough, Google some of the breeds we mention in the episode.

And we unfortunately have no idea who let the dogs out still...sorry.

Further Reading

  • Fagan, B. (2015) The Intimate Bond: How animals shaped human history

  • London: Bloomsbury Press

  • Toynbee, J.M.C. (2013) Animals in Roman Life & Art

  • Barnsley: Pen & Sword

  • Merrifield, R. (1987) The Archaeology of Ritual and Magic

  • London: Guild Publishing London

  • Van Grouw, K. (2018) Unnatural Selection

  • Oxfordshire: Princeton University Press

  • Houlbrook, C. and Armitage, N. (2015) The Materiality of Magic. Oxford: Oxbow Books.

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Random Encounter Episode II - CRMArch 146

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Our special guest rolls a die and we pick a brief topic to discuss. Always steeped in roll-playing tradition, this game takes a cyberpunk setting.

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Bill Whitehead on Using Drones in Contract Archaeology - ArchaeoTech 88

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Drones are here to stay in CRM Archaeology. Archaeologist Bill Whitehead of SWCA in New Mexico talks about how they're using drones and other technology to enhance the products they can return to customers and increase the accuracy of their maps. At some point in the near future we're going to see a requirement for an FAA Part 107 UAS license on a job advertisement. No is the time to start learning about these so you aren't left in the dust later on.

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Food Sovereignty and Natives Outdoors - HeVo 21

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On today’s podcast we have Ashleigh Thompson (Miskwaagamiiwi-zaaga’igan- Red Lake Anishinaabe Nation), a fourth year PhD student at Jessica’s alma mater, the University of Arizona. She talks about how she came to anthropology and the importance of representation. We talk about food sovereignty and not oversimplifying the way we talk about people based on their food practices. We also go into what it’s like to reconnect with your culture and language as an adult and the importance of education both to have a larger impact and what it can teach you about yourself. Finally, we close out by hearing more about Natives Outdoors (a public benefit corporation trying to increase Native American representation in the recreation industry that gives 5% of the profits on their gear back to Native American run non-profits focusing on language & cultural preservation, outdoor recreation, and environmental issues), cultural appropriation, and how we can balance recreation, preservation, and being respectful at culturally important places.

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It's Unethical to NOT Go Digital - CRMArch 145

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Going digital is, in Chris’ opinion, a morale and ethical imperative. We are the stewards of other people’s history and it’s our job to ensure their data are secure for as long as it takes. This quote regarding the destruction of the Brazil Museum in September of 2018 says it all:

Folks, there’s nothing left from the Linguistics division. We lost all the indigenous languages collection: the recordings since 1958, the chants in all the languages for which there are no native speakers alive anymore, the Curt Niemuendaju archives: papers, photos, negatives, the original ethnic-historic-linguistic map localizing all the ethnic groups in Brazil, the only record that we had from 1945. The ethnological and archeological references of all ethnic groups in Brazil since the 16th century… An irreparable loss of our historic memory. It just hurts so much to see all in ashes.
— Cinda Gonda

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