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CRM Archaeology, The Maya, and More with Dr. Amanda Harvey - TAS 66

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Today’s show was recorded as a live radio show on KNVC, 95.1 FM, Carson Community Media in Carson City, Nevada on May 10th, 2019. Chris spoke with archaeologist Dr. Amanda Harvey about her career in archaeology which spans the Maya, the southeast, and the Great Basin.

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The Cowboys of Science with Spencer Pelton - Ruins 01

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Spencer is one of the most talented, accomplished, and brilliant archaeologists in the country. The dude has over a dozen publications and literally just got his PhD last year.

Anyone that knows Spencer will tell you that he’s one of the most enjoyable people to be around and was a mentor to a lot of us during our time at Wyoming.

Spencer’s research varies from lithic technology, hunter-gatherer ecology, to human evolution, and his dissertation focused on hominid thermal regulation.

The list of his accomplishments would fill this page, so we’ll let his smooth, Johnny Cash-like drawl tell you his life story! We’re super excited.

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Determining Eligibility - CRMArch 163

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Using criteria from the National Park Service and other sources archaeologists are tasked to determine an archaeological resource's eligibility for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. This isn't so easy sometimes and we have criteria and integrity considerations to look at. This episode is a discussion of that process and the issues that come up when trying to do it.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Career Monitors and Mental Health - Ep 162

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In some areas of the country archaeologists are monitoring for construction projects. That’s not unique. What is unique is that some of these archaeologists are monitoring for years at a time and they’re losing their skills. We talk about that, and, mental health issues in contract archaeology.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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The Archaeological Spectrum - HeVo 28

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Rebecca Heidenreich (Diné), a graduate student at Arizona State University (and Jessica even refrained from making any Sun Devils jokes!) studying GIS. Rebecca talks about her experiences in both academia and CRM and how the two differ. She also talks about what it’s like navigating indigenous and scientific perspectives. It’s a very personal interview and an important listen for anyone trying to better understand what it’s like to be an indigenous archaeologist.

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SAA2019, #metoo, and a Response from SAA President Joe Watkins - CRMArch 161.2

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A few APN hosts and a guest joined together at the 2019 Society for American Archaeology meetings in New Mexico to talk about the issues that took place at the meeting, the SAA response, and how we can all do better.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Uploaded by Society for American Archaeology on 2019-04-18.
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CRM Archaeology with Michelle Cross - Ep61

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Today’s show is a recording of Chris’ radio show on Carson Community Media in Carson City, Nevada. it’s with CRM Archaeologist Michelle Cross from Stantec. She was just elected the next president of the Society for California Archaeology.

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Richie Cruz and CRM Archaeology from KNVC 95.1 FM - TAS 60

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This episode is a recording of a live radio show from Chris Webster called The Archaeology Radio Show. Listen live on Fridays at the links below. The guest is Richie Cruz and he talks about Cultural Resource Management Archaeology with Chris.

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Anarchy in CRMArch with Lewis Borck - CRMArch 159

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In this episode we speak with Lewis Borck about his article "Constructing the Future History: Prefiguration as Historical Epistemology and the Chronopolitics of Archaeology" and how it applies to CRM archaeology as we practice it.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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CALL TO ACTION - African-American Burial Grounds Network Act - CRMArch 157.1

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There is a Bill going before Congress today, February 13th, 2019 regarding setting up an African-American Burial Grounds Network within the National Park Service. Below in the links are the summary document and the actual bill.

If you’re listening to this in the future then hopefully this was successful. If it wasn’t, well, let’s try again!

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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The Longest Running Podcast about Professional Archaeology - 6 Years Old - CRMArch 157

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For the last six year's we've been podcasting about the field of CRM Archaeology. We've had our ups and downs, just like the industry, but through it all we've continued to bring you awesome topics, great interviews, and educated commentary. Thanks for the past six years and here's to another six!

Special thanks to Bill’s kids, Ruckus the Cat, and all the partners and families of the hosts that allow us to do this every two weeks!

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Can Your ClipBoard Do That? - TAS 55

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Today play another episode of the live-on-Facebook show “You Call This Archaeology” with Chris Webster and Richie Cruz. We talk about contract archaeology, wireless chargers, Megan Fox, and the digital archaeology transition, among other things. Get notified when we go live on Facebook by liking the page!

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Historical Archaeology with Dr. Bill White - CRMArch 152

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Dr. Bill White, long-time host of this show, talks to us about historical archaeology. What is historical archaeology? When does it start in the United States? When does it end? What are some of the biggest questions in historic archaeology? Also, what's going historic in 2019 as a result of the 50-year-rule. These questions and more on the 152nd running of the CRM Archaeology Podcast.

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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Lincoln Harschlip - Profiles 76

Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?

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Micah Smith - Profiles 75

Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?

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Bill Whitehead on Using Drones in Contract Archaeology - ArchaeoTech 88

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Drones are here to stay in CRM Archaeology. Archaeologist Bill Whitehead of SWCA in New Mexico talks about how they're using drones and other technology to enhance the products they can return to customers and increase the accuracy of their maps. At some point in the near future we're going to see a requirement for an FAA Part 107 UAS license on a job advertisement. No is the time to start learning about these so you aren't left in the dust later on.

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Zooarchaeology 101 - Animals 01

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Zooarchaeology is, as the word suggests, the study of animal remains from archaeological sites. It is a relatively new discipline that has been steadily  gaining popularity since the 1970s. Zooarchaeology can provide inference on past people’s economy, dietary habits, society and culture. 

Faunal remains recovered from archaeological sites are initially processed, identified to element and species whenever possible and finally used in quantitative and qualitative analyses to further our understanding of a given archaeological site. Zooarchaeologists will frequently attempt to gather information on the animals’ age, sex and season of death as well as looking out for bone modification (either pathological or taphonomical i.e. signs of disease and butchery/burning/gnawing). This data will then be analysed within the regional and historical context of the site.

When carrying out the analysis of a faunal assemblage, the first step is to identify as many bone fragments as possible to element and species. It is important for this process to be as accurate as possible, thus if in doubt it is best to label the specimen as unidentifiable rather than risking biasing your sample). As not all recovered fragments will not have retained enough diagnostic characteristic for confident ID, the whole sample is somewhat biased from the very beginning, hence it’d be best not to add to that with potential misidentifications. Identification of skeletal remains is largely carried out by morphological analysis, though species which present a similar anatomy may require additional tools such as biometry (which relies on measurements): this is the case for sheep/goat, to mention a few. Morphological ID is a skill that takes a lot of practice to refine, and reference collections represent an invaluable asset in order to learn and maintain your knowledge of comparative skeletal anatomy. These will be mostly comprised of modern specimens of known ID. It is important to bear in mind, however, that the morphology of a given species is unlikely to have remained static throughout time and your archaeological material may thus slightly differ to the modern reference specimen. Some species also present remarkable morphological and size variations (dogs, for instance), so these are all factors to be mindful of when analysing an archaeological assemblage.

The age at death of an animal is frequently determined based on epiphyseal fusion. For those who are unfamiliar with the concept, most bone is comprised of two parts: the central diaphysis (commonly known as the shaft) and the two epiphysis, which stand at the periphery of the bone. In several bones, these three parts are not fused together at birth, and research has been carried out to determine fusion age stages for different elements and species. 

Another frequently used method for ageing is tooth eruption and wear. 
Assigning age at death is useful in order to determine kill off patterns, which ultimately provide inference on animal exploitation. For instance, a sample mostly comprised by adult/elderly cattle indicates that they may have been used as working animals. Similarly, if the sample is comprised by numerous juveniles as well as adults, dairy production is a likely candidate. 

Further inference on exploitation is provided by sexing the animals, which is usually carried out by looking for sexually dimorphic traits (i.e. morphological traits which will differ between males and female - e.g. antler in male cervids, with the exception of reindeer). 

Pathology is the study of disease. It can provide information on animal exploitation and sometimes pet keeping. The latter hypothesis is for instance argued when an individual presents numerous pathologies which required constant human care and that would render the animal economically unviable to keep, yet it was still looked after. 

A common marker of animal exploitation which is not uncommon in cattle remains is a bone growth within the metatarsal/tarsal articulation, known as spavin. The latter is caused by chronic inflammation, most likely induced by traction. 

Taphonomy is a huge subject and an academic discipline in its own right. Within zooarchaeology, the aspects of taphonomy which are mostly looked at are man/animal induced bone modification. This can take the form of butcher marks, scorching caused by cooking, and gnawing from domestic animals and scavengers alike. 

Further Reading

  • "Identifying and Interpreting Animal Bones: A Manual" - April M. Beisaw (2013)
  • "The Archaeology of Animal Bones" - Terry O'Connor (2000)
  • "On the Average Day of a Zooarchaeologist, or Like, So What Do You Even Do?" - Alex Fitzpatrick https://animalarchaeology.com/2017/11/09/

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Hotels on the Weekend and Fire Season - CRMArch 143

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Sonia and Chris start the episode by discussing something we saw on Facebook - which is something no one should do! Anyway, should archaeologists get per diem on the weekends on long term projects? We have our opinions. We spend the rest of the episode talking about the rough fire season in the western U.S. and how to deal with smoke and fire's effects on archaeology.

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Competition Amongst Archaeologists - CRMArch 142

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From academic positions to field positions to contracts archaeologists find themselves in a race to the bottom competing with each other in an already strapped industry. Why does this happen and how can we fix it? We toss out some of our ideas on this episode.

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Creating a Universal Site Form - CRMArch 141

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Is it possible? Can a universal site form really cover all sites? Stephen, Doug, and Chris discuss the possibilities, problems, and practicality of this idea. Tell us what you think!

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Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Chris W @Archeowebby,@DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

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