native american

Central Plains Archaeology: Plain and Simple - HeVo 27

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Carlton Shield Chief Gover, a PhD student at the University of Colorado, Boulder and a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. We talked about the unique history of Oklahoma and particularly the Pawnee and Arikara Nations. We talk about the challenges of when oral history and archaeology don’t agree and what it’s like to work in academia, CRM, and in tribal settings. Finally we talk about where he would love to see the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma’s THPO and Museum go in the future, as well as where he would like the field of anthropology to go.

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Museums, Representation, and Intersectionality - HeVo 24

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On today’s podcast we have Brandon Castle, a Senior in Fort Lewis College’s Anthropology Department, who has also worked at the Totem Heritage Center in Alaska, the Center of Southwest Studies in Colorado, the Field Museum of Natural History in Illinois, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He also discusses his work for Fort Lewis College’s Gender and Sexuality Resource Center. Brandon shares ideas on improving representation, intersectionality, collaboration, and the creation of safe spaces in anthropology and museums. We additionally talk about stereotyping and appropriation, including totems and two-spirit identities. Finally we take on how you experience identity differently in different settings and the balance between cultural relativism and pushing for culture change.

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Greater Chaco Landscape - Heritage Voices 22

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On today’s podcast we are hugely honored to have three special guests who spoke with Jessica about the Greater Chaco Landscape during their advocacy trip to Washington D.C. The first segment features All Pueblo Council of Governors (APCG) Chairman Edward Paul Torres and former Governor of the Pueblo of Tesuque and co-chair of the APCG’s Natural Resources Committee, Mark Mitchell. In the second segment we have Keegan King, an advocate for the Greater Chaco Landscape from the Pueblo of Acoma. They speak about what Chaco means to them as individuals and to their Pueblos, how they would like to see the area managed, their local and national advocacy efforts, collaborating with the Navajo Nation on these efforts, and appropriate behavior at places like Chaco Canyon. Finally we talk about, what they would like to see in tribal consultation in general and specifically how you can support their efforts to protect the Greater Chaco Landscape.

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Food Sovereignty and Natives Outdoors - HeVo 21

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On today’s podcast we have Ashleigh Thompson (Miskwaagamiiwi-zaaga’igan- Red Lake Anishinaabe Nation), a fourth year PhD student at Jessica’s alma mater, the University of Arizona. She talks about how she came to anthropology and the importance of representation. We talk about food sovereignty and not oversimplifying the way we talk about people based on their food practices. We also go into what it’s like to reconnect with your culture and language as an adult and the importance of education both to have a larger impact and what it can teach you about yourself. Finally, we close out by hearing more about Natives Outdoors (a public benefit corporation trying to increase Native American representation in the recreation industry that gives 5% of the profits on their gear back to Native American run non-profits focusing on language & cultural preservation, outdoor recreation, and environmental issues), cultural appropriation, and how we can balance recreation, preservation, and being respectful at culturally important places.

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Seneca-Iroquois National Museum - HeVo 20

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On today’s podcast we speak with David L. George-Shongo, Jr., Acting Director of the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum. The Seneca-Iroquois National Museum just celebrated opening a brand new $18M facility, including a new museum/cultural center, archives, and decontamination area. Dave talks about the opening and the long process of developing the museum in the community (without bringing in any outside funding!). He also speaks about NAGPRA from the 1990s until now and working with other tribes to provide curation space if needed as well. He discusses the Men’s Cultural and Ritual Language Program and the importance of using Seneca words in explaining Seneca concepts in addition acting in a culturally appropriate manner while doing anthropology or heritage preservation. Mostly, he wants people to understand that the Seneca are people too and not only that they are still here even if they use modern tools, but that they will be here as Seneca into the future.

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SAA2018 Wrap-Up - Heritage Voices 17

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Near the end of the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Conference held this year in Washington, D.C., host Jessica Yaquinto sat down with a few people in the APN mobile studio to talk about what they had presented, seen, and heard at the conference. 

Joining Jessica are, Kassie Rippee, Briece Edwards, Desiree Martinez, Wade Campbell, and Dorothy Lippert.

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Live Panel on Bears Ears National Monument - Heritage Voices 15

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On March 3rd, 2018 Lyle hosted a live panel on Bears Ears National Monument with indigenous activists at Friends of Cedar Mesa’s annual Celebrate Cedar Mesa event. In addition to Lyle himself, the panel also featured Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (former co-chair of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman and current Education Coordinator for the Ute Indian Museum), Ed Kabotie (Hopi/Tewa artist, musician, and activist) and Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi, Filmmaker and Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikeyah). The four talk about their experiences with Bears Ears National Monument, but also use the topic to discuss larger issues, including tribal sovereignty, indigenous and Western science collaborations, boarding schools, and how we can all be better activists. Their heartfelt words led to a standing ovation and an encore. Thank you again to Friends of Cedar Mesa and to all the panelists.

The time of the Indian expert is over. It’s time for expert Indians.
— Angelo Baca - Utah Dine Bikeyah
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Ethnography, Videography, and Public Anthropology - Heritage Voices 13

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On today’s episode, Jessica interviews Dr. Sean Gantt, Acting Director of Education for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. He talks about his vision for education at Crow Canyon, the value of public anthropology, and what drew him to this type of work. Sean also talks about his work as a graduate student working for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. There he helped with the development of an interpretation plan for the Nanih Waiya cultural landscape, the Choctaw Mother Mound, which was transferred to the tribe from a state park. From there we discuss videography and ethnography, including the importance of community based and reciprocal methods. Finally we close out by talking about specific ways that anthropology can improve as a discipline, including the role of conferences, and specific actions individual anthropologists can take to make anthropology a safer space for indigenous people.

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Working with Museums Panel - Heritage Voices 9

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We are excited to share our first panel episode with you. In addition to being a panel episode, this episode is also a crossover episode with the Go Dig a Hole podcast. Today’s panel features indigenous archaeologists, cultural anthropologists, and even a THPO from the Southwest, California, Pacific Northwest, and Plains tribes talking about their experiences working with museums. They talk about the major challenges they face with museums, including representation, repatriation, and past preservation techniques, as well as positive museum experiences and the directions they would like to see museums go in the future. Finally they give guidance on how museums and tribes can better work together in the future. 

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Decolonizing Anthropology - Heritage Voices 8

Today’s episode features Anna Cordova, Lead Archaeologist for the City of Colorado Springs (although, to be clear, she is not representing the city with this interview). If you are looking to understand indigenous perspectives on archaeology, this episode is a great place to start because she explains the challenges so clearly and so passionately! We talk about the importance of decolonizing anthropology and some specific suggestions on how to do that. We also discuss indigenous geography, the differences between working in Hawaii and Colorado, and her experiences doing ethnographic and tribal consultation work.

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