Publishing - Episode 19

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On Today’s episode, Jessica hosts a panel focused on publishing. The panel includes Dr. Lisa Hardy (Editor of one of the Society for Applied Anthropology’s (SFAA) journals, Practicing Anthropology), Sarah Herr (Editor of one of the Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) journals, Advances in Archaeological Practice), Dr. Kathleen Van Vlack (Editor of the High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology’s (HPSFAA) journal The Applied Anthropologist), and Dr. David Martinez (Akimel O’odham, Associate Professor of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University). Unfortunately, due to some last minute technical difficulties, Lyle was unable to join the call as co-host and panelist. Also, we actually recorded this episode back in March, so you may notice that things we mentioned happened awhile ago, so sorry about all that. We talked about everyone’s experience with publishing, tips for those who are interesting in publishing, challenges with diversity in publishing, and where they would like to see publishing going in the future. These amazing editors look forward to working with you towards publishing in their journals!

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Tribal Collaboration on the Lower Colorado River - Episode 18

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What happens to a people when the river no longer flows to them? Or it flows, but no longer supports the associated plant and animal communities so important to their culture? What do they do about it? Today’s podcast features Nora McDowell, former Fort Mohave Indian Tribe Tribal Councilwoman and Jill McCormick, Historic Preservation Officer for the Quechan Tribe and the former Cultural Resources Manager and Archaeologist for the Cocopah Indian Tribe for 12 years. They talk about their collaborative efforts with other tribes in both the US and Mexico towards environmental, cultural, and spiritual restoration of the Lower Colorado River. We also talk about natural resources as cultural resources, improving tribal consultation and representation, and how to manage competing interests from various groups, as well as within a tribe.  

This episode is dedicated to Mr. Dale Phillips (1946 – 2016), Former Vice-Chairman, Cocopah Indian Tribe.  It was his concept, that is the basis for the creation of the Tribal River Vision project.  Mr. Phillips was a respected Tribal Leader, Bird Song singer, Spiritual and Cultural mentor who touched many lives both inside and outside of Indian Country.  His vision of a “Mighty Colorado River” that once again reached the delta was the inspiration of this work.  His love of both the cultural and natural world and the responsibilities of the Tribes to protect these entities are the guiding force for the vision of the future of the Colorado River.  We are honored to continue this work in his name and dedicated to seeing the Vision shared and realized.
— Ms. Nora McDowell and Ms. Jill McCormick
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SAA2018 Wrap-Up - Episode 17

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Near the end of the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Conference held this year in Washington, D.C., host Jessica Yaquinto sat down with a few people in the APN mobile studio to talk about what they had presented, seen, and heard at the conference. 

Joining Jessica are, Kassie Rippee, Briece Edwards, Desiree Martinez, Wade Campbell, and Dorothy Lippert.

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Ethnography with African Descendent Communities - Episode 16

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Today’s podcast features Dr. Antoinette Jackson, Associate Professor at the University of South Florida. We talk about her work with the Gullah Geechee and the importance of representation in telling people’s stories. We contrast their experience with her work with the local communities in the U.S. Virgin Islands and the National Park Service. She talks about how to work with descendent communities with less formalized power structures, as well as how to work more ethically with descendant communities in general. Finally, we talk about the town of Archery, which provides an interesting juxtaposition of how stories are told, being both a predominately African-American community and the boyhood home of former President Jimmy Carter. Finally, she shares what it’s like interviewing a former President!  

Present Pasts Call for Papers (PDF)

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Live Panel on Bears Ears National Monument - Episode 15

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On March 3rd, 2018 Lyle hosted a live panel on Bears Ears National Monument with indigenous activists at Friends of Cedar Mesa’s annual Celebrate Cedar Mesa event. In addition to Lyle himself, the panel also featured Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (former co-chair of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman and current Education Coordinator for the Ute Indian Museum), Ed Kabotie (Hopi/Tewa artist, musician, and activist) and Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi, Filmmaker and Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikeyah). The four talk about their experiences with Bears Ears National Monument, but also use the topic to discuss larger issues, including tribal sovereignty, indigenous and Western science collaborations, boarding schools, and how we can all be better activists. Their heartfelt words led to a standing ovation and an encore. Thank you again to Friends of Cedar Mesa and to all the panelists.

The time of the Indian expert is over. It’s time for expert Indians.
— Angelo Baca - Utah Dine Bikeyah
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