A Body Stamp from Nisibon - Episode 12

When this discussion was recorded Angus was feeling pretty hungry. Just the time for Alice to present some roundish, brownish, nicely decorated objects to him that she found at a site near Nisíbon (Dominican Republic). Naturally Angus thoughts these things look like cookies or like baking moulds. Of course they are not! Yet these objects may not be a feast for the stomach, they would have given you a feast for the eyes as they were likely used for body or cloth decoration. In other words, these objects prove that those silly 16th century Spaniards were quite wrong when they described the indigenous people as going about naked. Would you like to know more colourful facts about them? Get ready as we stamp out Angus’s and the Spanish silly beliefs about these enigmatic clay objects in this all new episode!

Head over to the website for this show to see images related to the conversation: http://www.shoresoftime.com/portfolios/episode-12-a-body-stamp/

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A Pelican Bowl from Anguilla's Shoal Bay East - Episode 11

Help yourself to a giant beakful of Caribbean history as we talk pelicans past and present with John Crock. As you will hear John has a voice that was made to be on the radio, but fortunately for us he would rather do archaeology on Anguilla, where he found this week’s object: a pelican bowl.

Is it coincidence it was found one of the most beautiful beaches on earth? Why does this round-bellied bowl have pelican iconography and what are some of the other important sites on this small, yet friendly and archaeologically important island? Listen to this fisherman’s tale right now!

Go to the HOTC website for images related to the episode: http://www.shoresoftime.com/portfolios/episode-11-a-pelican-bowl/

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A Baldric Buckle - Episode 10

A new syndicated podcast from the archaeology podcast network!

We're linking over to a show all about the archaeology of the Caribbean. The hosts have their own feed so go check out "A History of the Caribbean" on iTunes and SoundCloud.

Check out the website for this episode at:

http://www.shoresoftime.com/portfolios/episode-10-a-baldric-buckle/

Show Notes

Buckle up! This week we look at an early 19th century military buckle from the Cabrits on Dominica, AKA the Gibraltar of the Caribbean, the Unfortunate Garrison or the Black Garrison. Why was this fortress known by the latter name? And why was an ornament of the West India Regiment left in a wattle and daub structure in the vicinity of this mighty fortress, together with a needle, glass bottles, French crockery and some other assorted finds? Fortunately, Alice and Angus are joined by Zachary Beier who found this object and the answers to our questions. Want to learn something about the surprising military and social history this object was witness to? Listen to this week’s episode of A History of the Caribbean in 100 Objects!

To look at while you listen to us:

More information:

  • The importance of the Cabrits for Dominica’s national identity and how it was recently restored, by Dr. Lennox Honychurch.
  • An overview of the excavations by Dr. Mark Hauser at Sugarloaf (plantation also mentioned by Zach in this episode)
  • The page by the Dominican tourist board on the Cabrits. There isn’t much info there, so if you are interested in going there, why not have a look at Tripadvisor too?
  • If this was interesting to you, why not listen to our episode with Todd Ahlmann on a coin he found from the same time period in St. Kitts. We briefly talk about Brimstone Hill and discuss enslaved life as it was outside of the military.
  • Zach has recommended the following papers to us:
    • Beier, Zachary J. M.
      • 2014. The Cabrits Garrison. In The Encyclopedia of Caribbean Archaeology, edited by Basil Reid and R. Grant Gilmore III, pp. 83-84. University of Florida Press, Gainesville, FL.
      • 2011. Initial Feasibility and Reconnaissance at the Cabrits Garrison, Dominica. In Proceedings of the XXIIII Congress of the International Association of Caribbean Archaeology
    • Buckley, Roger Norman
      • 1998. The British Army in the West Indies: Society and the Military in the Revolutionary Age. University Press of Florida, Gainesville, FL.
      • 1980. “Black Man”—The Mutiny of the 8th (British) West India Regiment: A Microcosm of War and Slavery in the Caribbean.  The Jamaican Historical Review, XII:52-76.
      • 1979. Slaves in Red Coats: The British West India Regiments, 1795-1815. Yale University Press, New Haven, CT.
    • Schroedl, Gerald F. and Todd M. Ahlman
      • 2002. The Maintenance of Cultural and Personal Identities of Enslaved Africans and British Soldiers at           the Brimstone Hill Fortress, St. Kitts, West Indies.  Historical Archaeology 36(4):38-49

As always thank you for listening and please share this podcast with friends, family and general fans of cool objects that are part of great and world-spanning histories.  Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter @theshoresoftime about what you think of the podcast and how we can improve the way we  share these stories of the Caribbean and its objects. FYI the podcast has moved to a bi-weekly release schedule for the summer months. We are planning to be back with a weekly release schedule in September.

We’ll talk to you next time, and remember: In this great future you can’t forget your past!

Acknowledgements: This podcast was made possible thanks to financial support by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). Alice is employed by University of Leicester’s School of Ancient History and Archaeology and Angus works at Stanford University’s Archaeology CenterZachary Beier is assistant professor at the Department of History and Archaeology of the University of the West Indies Mona Campus.

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Taguabo and Maicabo - Episode 9

A new syndicated podcast from the archaeology podcast network!

We're linking over to a show all about the archaeology of the Caribbean. The hosts have their own feed so go check out "A History of the Caribbean" on iTunes and SoundCloud.

Show Notes

Two objects for the price of one this episode! We talk with Dr. Jorge Ulloa about two figurines from Avilla (Holguín Cuba). They were found exactly one year apart in the same cave by the same man, Alejandro Reyes Atencio, after his mother. One is called Taguabo, the other Maicabo. Want to find out why these objects that look so different still belong together? Want to know more about some of Cuba’s syncretic religious traditions and how Amerindian objects figure into this? Want to find out how you can make it rain or shine on command? Listen to this episode of A History of the Caribbean in 100 Objects!

Further information:

 

As always thank you for listening and please share this podcast with friends, family and general fans of cool objects that are part of great and world-spanning histories.  Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter @theshoresoftime about what you think of the podcast and how we can improve the way we  share these stories of the Caribbean and its objects.

We’ll talk to you next time, and remember: In this great future you can’t forget your past!

Acknowledgements: This podcast was made possible thanks to financial support by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). Alice is employed by University of Leicester’s School of Ancient History and Archaeology and Angus works at Stanford University’s Archaeology Center. Jorge Ulloa Hung is a researcher at the Museo del Hombre DominicanoLeiden University and a professor at INTEC.

Images

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