Museums, Representation, and Intersectionality - HeVo 24

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On today’s podcast we have Brandon Castle, a Senior in Fort Lewis College’s Anthropology Department, who has also worked at the Totem Heritage Center in Alaska, the Center of Southwest Studies in Colorado, the Field Museum of Natural History in Illinois, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He also discusses his work for Fort Lewis College’s Gender and Sexuality Resource Center. Brandon shares ideas on improving representation, intersectionality, collaboration, and the creation of safe spaces in anthropology and museums. We additionally talk about stereotyping and appropriation, including totems and two-spirit identities. Finally we take on how you experience identity differently in different settings and the balance between cultural relativism and pushing for culture change.

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Radio Killed the Podcast Star - TAS 53

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On Friday, Dec. 7th, 2018 Chris took this show on the radio. He’s doing a new show every Friday from 12pm to 1pm PST. Unfortunately the equipment that normally records the live broadcast went down before the show and no one noticed. So, Richie Cruz joined us again to talk about the show and some other things in a Facebook Live episode of You Call This Archaeology.

Links

  • Find the radio show here: KNVC

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Heritage Chat Bots (To Bot or Not?) - ArchaeoTech 94

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Chat bots are taking over conversations with customer service and social media applications like Facebook Messenger. But, do they belong in heritage situations? Can chat bots help outreach and interact with the public or are they just one more distraction? We talk about chat bots in the context of a recent article from the Society for American Archaeology’s Advances in Archaeological Practice on this episode.

Links

  • ‚ÄúCan Heritage Bots Thrive? Toward Future Engagement in Cultural Heritage‚ÄĚ - Angeliki Tzouganatou

    • DOI: 10.1017/aap.2018.32

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Historical Archaeology with Dr. Bill White - CRMArch 152

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Dr. Bill White, long-time host of this show, talks to us about historical archaeology. What is historical archaeology? When does it start in the United States? When does it end? What are some of the biggest questions in historic archaeology? Also, what's going historic in 2019 as a result of the 50-year-rule. These questions and more on the 152nd running of the CRM Archaeology Podcast.

Links

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Follow Our Panelists On Twitter

Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

Blogs:

Cryptozoology (featuring Archaeological Fantasies) - Animals 05

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Today's show is a crossover special with archaeology podcast "Archaeological Fantasies"!

Cryptids are creatures from fiction, folklore, and fantasy. There have been many alleged cases of "zooarchaeological evidence" to prove the existence of certain imaginary creatures, but most of these tend to be poorly identified real animal remains. Of course, there are some instances of intentional hoaxes, where creative manipulation and taxidermy have been used to create fake evidence (see: PT Barnum and other roadside attractions).

Further Reading

- https://animalarchaeology.com/2018/11/19/troweling-theme-parks-creating-cryptozoological-remains-in-expedition-everest/

- Loxton, D. and Prothero, D.R. (2013) Abominable Science: Origins of the Yeti, Nessie, and Other Famous Cryptids. Columbia University Press.

- http://www.thecarpetbagger.org/2013/01/straight-out-of-fiji-merman.html

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Disaster Preparedness for Archaeology Sites - ArchaeoTech 93

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Disaster preparedness takes many forms - depending on who you are and what you do. It's also important for archaeology sites. Creating relationships with major and local agencies and locating archaeology sites in jeopardy is paramount to preserving history. When disaster strikes we should be ready to respond or have recorded as much as possible already.

On today's show we talk about an article in the November 2018 issue of the SAA's Advances in Archaeological Practice that tackles these issues.

Links

  • ‚ÄúFinding the Negative in the Positive: Archaeology and Data Collection in the Face of Natural Disasters‚ÄĚ - Tanya M. Peres and Aaron Deter-Wolf

    • DOI:

      10.1017/aap.2018.29

App of the Day

Drone Giveaway!

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You Call This Archaeology? - CRMArch 150

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Every so often Chris Webster and Richie Cruz, both archaeologists, broadcast live on the APN Facebook page. It's a show called "You Call This Archaeology?" We talk about archaeology and many other things. Instead of our normal show we bring you the 49th recording of YCTA. Enjoy, and, like our Facebook page so you'll know when we go live again.

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Follow Our Panelists On Twitter

Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

Blogs:

Salish-Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation Program - HeVo 23

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On today’s podcast we have Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs. We talk about the blending of ethnography and archaeology within indigenous archaeology, as well as the identity challenges that many young Native Americans face and how indigenous archaeology can be one part of a holistic picture that can give young people a sense of who they are and hope for the future. He shares his experience working with National Geographic as one example of how photography and archaeology can reinstill that sense of identity.

‚ÄúThe application of oral histories to archaeology is at the forefront of the research, at no point is the narrative of tribal people secondary. This methodology is the foundation of our work. No longer should Indian people be delegated to the appendices. No longer are we ‚Äėsupplemental‚Äô humans‚ÄĚ.

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Disappearing Data with Keith Kintigh - ArchaeoTech 92

Leadership with Author Vishal Agarwal - CRMArch 149

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Almost everyone will admit that leadership training and practices are badly needed, and are in fact missing, within Cultural Resource Management. We need all the help we can get! Vishal Agarwal, author of ‚ÄúGive to Get‚ÄĚ talks to us about leadership and navigating through work environments.

Links

Follow Our Panelists On Twitter

Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

Blogs:

Sheep vs Goats - Animals 04

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Sheep are the domesticated form of the mouflon (Ovis orientalis), which was domesticated around 11,000-9,000 BC and represents one of the earliest instances of domestication after dogs. As with all domestications, it is important to keep in mind that this was most likely not a single event, rather several attempts taking place in different locations and time periods.

Sheep husbandry quickly spread across Europe from the Near East. Up until the Iron Age, sheep would have largely been small, short tailed and varied in colour.

Goats were most likely domesticated in South West Asia, possible South East Europe. They are hardy and versatile animals which require relatively little care. Primitive goats would have had coarse hair and large horns. One such example is the present day British Primitive Goat, a rare breed now limited to few feral herds and captive individuals.

Sheep were a staple domesticate and, as such, used for a variety of products. In antiquity, wool was generally one of the most important products deriving from sheep farming. Goats would have also been kept for their hair and skins. Milk and meat would have also been important to different extents, and we can gage such extent based on what we recover archaeologically. Based on the kill off pattern of the specimens recovered within our assemblage, we can in fact argue what products sheep and goats would have been likely kept for. For instance, a high percentage of culled juvenile males suggest a milk-based economy

Sheep and goat are both Caprinae, and as such they will have uncannily similar morphological characteristics. The two can actually hybridise but this will inevitably result in infertile offspring, known as sheep/goat hybrids or geep. Telling the two species apart in the archaeological record is a task that requires outstanding observational skills and plenty of practice, and has been the focus of intensive research in recent years. Separating the two species is important as they will provide different information about the economy and environment they were part of.

A by no means exhaustive list of how to distinguish between sheep and goat bones is provided below:

1) Horns: Sheep horns tend to be parallel while goat horns are more divergent.

2) Teeth: In sheep, the third cusp of the third molar presents a small lip, while the third premolars appears square in sheep and triangular in goat.

3) Other diagnostic postcranial elements include the astragalus, distal humerus, calcaneum and metapodials.

Guest Interview: Albína Hulda Pálsdóttir

Find out more about our guest and her projects

Reference collection: https://www.icelandiczooarch.is/

Project website: https://www.mn.uio.no/cees/english/research/projects/690456/index.html

Follow Albina on twitter: https://twitter.com/AlbinaIcelander

Further Reading

  • Seder, M. , Latham, H. (2010) ‚ÄėAssessing the reliability of criteria used to identify postcranial bones in sheep, Ovis, and goats, Capra‚Äô

  • Journal of Archaeological Science (2010) 1-19

  • Crabtree, Pam J. 1995 The symbolic role of animals in Anglo-Saxon England: Evidence from burials and cremations. In The Symbolic Role of Animals in Archaeology. K. Ryan and P. J. Crabtree, eds. Pp. 20-6. MASCA Research Papers in Science and Archaeology. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania, University Museum

  • Russel, N. (2012) Social Zooarchaeology: Humans and Animals in Prehistory

  • Cambridge: Cambridge University Press

  • King, A. (1978) A Comparative Survey of Bone Assemblages from Roman Sites in Britain. Institute of Archaeology - London 15

  • Salvagno, L. And Albarella, U. (2017) ‚ÄėA morphometric system to distinguish sheep and goat postcranial bones‚Äô. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0178543.

  • https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0178543

  • Fagan, B. (2015) The Intimate Bond: How animals shaped human history

  • London: Bloomsbury Press

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Studying Human Evolution without the Humans - TAS 51

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Can you study human evolution without looking at humans or human ancestors specifically? Our guest on this show is doing just that. By studying old world monkeys in the fossil record, ASU graduate student Irene Smail is learning about how humans and monkeys ate and lived on the African landscape.

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Disappearing Data - ArchaeoTech 91

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What happens to archaeological data when the project is over? Are we doing all we can? Where does it go and how can we help? This is a response to a recent article.

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App of the Day

Drone Giveaway!

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CRM Archaeology, The Lovecraft Edition - CRMArch 148

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H.P. Lovecraft wrote many stories. I bet he never thought about archaeology while he was writing them. Well, we did. Here's another random encounters episode where we roll the dice and pair archaeology with horror. It'll be a wild ride where we talk about field stories, racism, and more.

Follow Our Panelists On Twitter

Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet

Blogs:

The Earliest North Americans with Dr. David Kilby - TAS 50

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The people known to archaeologists as "Clovis" were widely thought to be the first people to migrate to North America. Where did they come from and how did they get here? Also, when did they get here? These questions remain unanswered in North American Prehistory but we're getting a lot closer. Dr. David Kilby joins us to talk theories and some of the latest evidence.

Lincoln Harschlip - Profiles 76

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Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?

Greater Chaco Landscape - Heritage Voices 22

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On today’s podcast we are hugely honored to have three special guests who spoke with Jessica about the Greater Chaco Landscape during their advocacy trip to Washington D.C. The first segment features All Pueblo Council of Governors (APCG) Chairman Edward Paul Torres and former Governor of the Pueblo of Tesuque and co-chair of the APCG’s Natural Resources Committee, Mark Mitchell. In the second segment we have Keegan King, an advocate for the Greater Chaco Landscape from the Pueblo of Acoma. They speak about what Chaco means to them as individuals and to their Pueblos, how they would like to see the area managed, their local and national advocacy efforts, collaborating with the Navajo Nation on these efforts, and appropriate behavior at places like Chaco Canyon. Finally we talk about, what they would like to see in tribal consultation in general and specifically how you can support their efforts to protect the Greater Chaco Landscape.

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So You Want To Be A Drone Pilot? - ArchaeoTech 90

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Drones are fast becoming a standard archaeological tool. Their cool factor is undeniable, but maybe you're on the fence about their actual utility. Or, maybe you're sold on their usefulness and want to jump in but don't know where to start. In today's episode of the ArchaeoTech Podcast, we'll help get you up to speed.

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App of the Day

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Micah Smith - Profiles 75

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Profiles in CRM features short interviews with CRM professionals from all experience levels and educational levels. I ask a standard list of questions and see how each person answers them based on their experience.

The Questions

  • What is your name and who do you work for? (this question is omitted for those that wish to be anonymous)

  • What's the highest degree you've earned?

  • How long have you been working in CRM?

  • Where have you worked?

  • What is the position you usually have in CRM and what is the highest position you've attained?

  • What is the best thing that's happened to you that's related to being a CRM Archaeologist?

  • What is the biggest thing you would change that would make being a CRM professional better?

  • What is your career goal in CRM?

  • If you could give an undergrad thinking about CRM one piece of advice, what would it be?