Protecting Marshall Island's Heritage in the Face of Climate Change - Episode 4.1

This episode is a follow up to the previous episode (episode 4) with Tina Stege about climate change in the Marshall Islands. This episode features both Tina Stege, Marshallese Anthropologist, and Jenny Newell, Collection Co-Manager at the Australian Museum, Sydney. The two talk about how museums can bring collections to life for associated communities, their collaborative ethnographic project looking at adaptions to climate change in the Marshall Islands, international repatriation vs. NAGPRA, as well as what role museums play related to climate change. We discuss questions such as “How can museums help preserve culture and help people adapt as homelands sink underwater?” and “what happens to sovereign governments as they no longer have a place to govern over”?

Links:

Contact:

Jessica Yaquinto
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org 
Twitter (@livingheritageA)

Climate Change and the Nuclear Legacy in the Marshall Islands - Episode 4

This episode features Marshallese Anthropologist Kristina Stege talking about her community based research and advocacy related to climate change and the nuclear legacy in the Marshall Islands. She first discusses the Marshall Islands’ quest for recognition and assistance related to the U.S. testing of nuclear bombs on their islands post-WWII. Then we discuss climate change effects, advocacy, community based research, mitigation effects, and the representation of pacific islanders in larger narratives.

Make sure to check out the follow up episode focusing on the role of museums related to climate change, including how do you preserve and maintain culture when your homeland will soon be underwater and how do you make museum collections relevant for associated communities.

Links:

Contact:

Jessica Yaquinto
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org 
Twitter (@livingheritageA) 

Diné Public, Fire, and Indigenous Archaeology - Episode 3

In this episode, we talk to Diné (Navajo) archaeologist, Jason Nez. He talks about being Diné and an archaeologist, challenges he faces as a Native American archaeologist, and how the way archaeology is presented (aliens!) can either empower or belittle tribes. He talks about his work educating both Diné youth and the general public about archaeology and Native American perspectives and why that is important. Finally, he highlights his experiences across the country as a fire archaeologist, including what that looks like, looting concerns, and learning from other tribes about their different cultural resources.

Contact:

Jessica Yaquinto jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org; Twitter (@livingheritageA

A Hopi perspective on Diversity in Anthropology and Grand Canyon- Episode 2

This episode is part two of the Grand Canyon National Park miniseries. Today we interview Heritage Voices co-host Lyle Balenquah, Hopi archaeologist, ethnographer, educator, advocate, and river guide extraordinaire about his background, diversity in Anthropology, and Hopi connections to the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon topics include the proposed Greater Grand Canyon National Monument, the Desert View Watchtower project, river running, and diversity in interpretation.

LINKS:

Contact:

Jessica
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org
Twitter: @livingheritageA
Lyle:
Email: Lyle.Balenquah@gmail.com
Twitter: @LyleBalenquah

Grand Canyon Tribal Program - Janet Cohen - Episode 1

This is part one of a mini-series on Grand Canyon National Park. Today we have Grand Canyon National Park’s Tribal Program Manager Janet Cohen on the podcast. We talk about Grand Canyon’s Inter-tribal Coalition, the Desert View Watchtower project, interpretation, and working with Zuni to address concerns related to fish management. Outside of Grand Canyon, we also talk about developing the NAGPRA program on the Navajo Nation in the early 90s and working with Alaska tribes to look impacts from the Exxon-Valdez oil spill.