The One Where Ross Isn’t The Only Paleontologist: A Deep Discussion with Amy Atwater - Ep5

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Episode 5’s guest, Amy Atwater, is the Paleontology Collections Manager/Registrar at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. She is also just an all-around bad-ass. She is an avid science communicator, and does so through presentations, videos, and her massively popular instagram account @Mary_annings_revenge. Amy was a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin and has a slew of peer-reviewed publications. She also has published work in The Huffington Post and has even appeared on PBS EONS.

We talk with her about how she got into paleontology, how she escaped the field of anthropology and how David and Connor are recovering paleontologists. We define the difference between archaeology and paleontology (Archaeologists Don’t Dig Dinosaurs!) while discussing deep time and stratigraphy. David and Amy discuss curation life and security and Amy explains who Mary Anning is and why she is so vengeful. We finish with a discussion about mental health in Academia. And, big surprise, Connor makes another crappy dad joke. Make sure and get your T-Rex arms clapping and waving as you begin listening to Episode 5 of A Life in Ruins Podcast.

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Ancient Ink with Aaron Deter-Wolf - Ep 04

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If you’ve been following us for a bit, you might notice that archaeology isn’t just pyramids or that ancient aliens bullshit...it’s the study of human behavior. And one world-wide human behavior that you’ve probably all observed, is the practice of tattooing and body modification. Well, that’s not really our niche, but lucky for you, we’re bought one of the world’s leading experts on the archaeology of tattooing to talk with us today. In fact, he co-wrote the book on it!

Tonight’s guest, Aaron Deter-Wolf, is currently the Prehistoric Archaeologist at the Tennessee Division of Archaeology. Aaron is responsible for managing prehistoric sites on State-owned lands, as well as conducting archaeological excavations and publishing research on the results of those studies. Most importantly, Aaron is a prominent advocate for public archaeology, as evidenced by his work with the state of Tennessee, his scholarly publications, and his new Instagram @archaeologyink.

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Rock Artin' and Rollin' with Emily Van Alst - Ep 03

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Tonight’s guest, Emily Van Alst, is a Descendant of the Lakota Sioux Nation and works avidly in public outreach.. Although the Lakota and Pawnee are historical enemies; Carlton and Emily have chosen to put aside their tribal differences to deliver our listeners an awesome episode.

Emily Van Alst got started in anthropology at Yale University and she is currently a PhD student at Indiana University Bloomington

Her research interests include Rock Art, Gender, Indigenous Archaeology, Public Archaeology, Indigenous Feminism, and Ethnography

As a goal of this podcast is to provide our listeners with multi-faceted approaches to archaeology, we are super excited to talk with her tonight. So let’s count some coup and get this episode started.

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The Cowboys of Science with Spencer Pelton - Ep 01

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Spencer is one of the most talented, accomplished, and brilliant archaeologists in the country. The dude has over a dozen publications and literally just got his PhD last year.

Anyone that knows Spencer will tell you that he’s one of the most enjoyable people to be around and was a mentor to a lot of us during our time at Wyoming.

Spencer’s research varies from lithic technology, hunter-gatherer ecology, to human evolution, and his dissertation focused on hominid thermal regulation.

The list of his accomplishments would fill this page, so we’ll let his smooth, Johnny Cash-like drawl tell you his life story! We’re super excited.

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Of Koobi Fora and Cathedrals with Ella Beaudoin - Ep 02

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Today's guest is someone who we wanted to snag as early as possible, based on her ability to connect with the public.

Ella Beaudoin got started in anthropology at American University, in Washington DC.

She cut her scientific teeth in Kenya as part of the Koobi Fora field School @koobiforafieldschool. The Koobi Fora region is one of the most prolific fossil bearing regions in the world and possibly home to the oldest instances of the use of fire by our hominid ancestors.

She is currently a contractor at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, where she works to help engage and teach the public about evolution and archaeology.

As the goal of this podcast is to connect non-archaeologists with our science, we are super excited to talk with her tonight.

You can follow her twitter at @ella_beaudoinand her instagram @timetravelerinhikingboots.

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