heritage voices

Cultural Landscapes Panel SAA2019 - HeVo 30

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On today’s episode Jessica hosts a panel at the 2019 Society of American Archaeology conference on Cultural Landscapes. Panelists include Dr. Kisha Supernant (Métis) Associate Professor at the University of Alberta, Wade Campbell (Diné), Ph.D. student at Harvard, Michelle La Pena, attorney, writer, and former Pit River Tribal Councilwoman, Dr. Sean Gantt, Director of Education at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Kassie Rippee, Tribal Historic Preservation Officer of the Coquille Indian Tribe, and Briece Edwards, Deputy THPO for the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde. Some of the considerations discussed include cultural landscapes and movement, landscape change through time and as a result of colonialism, the ephemeral nature of some cultural landscapes, representation of cultural landscapes, and the challenges of understanding landscape from a western science perspective.

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A Journey to Ancient Pawneeland - HeVo 29

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Roger Echo-Hawk, a writer / artist, and a citizen of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. We discussed his role in the origin story of what became Indigenous archaeology – the study of oral tradition; the unfolding racial Indian repatriation movement; the interfacing of archaeology and Indian Country; and the history of race and the rethinking of racial identity systems.

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Roger Echo-Hawk. Photo Credit: Linda Echo-Hawk

Roger Echo-Hawk. Photo Credit: Linda Echo-Hawk

The Archaeological Spectrum - HeVo 28

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Rebecca Heidenreich (Diné), a graduate student at Arizona State University (and Jessica even refrained from making any Sun Devils jokes!) studying GIS. Rebecca talks about her experiences in both academia and CRM and how the two differ. She also talks about what it’s like navigating indigenous and scientific perspectives. It’s a very personal interview and an important listen for anyone trying to better understand what it’s like to be an indigenous archaeologist.

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Central Plains Archaeology: Plain and Simple - HeVo 27

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Carlton Shield Chief Gover, a PhD student at the University of Colorado, Boulder and a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma. We talked about the unique history of Oklahoma and particularly the Pawnee and Arikara Nations. We talk about the challenges of when oral history and archaeology don’t agree and what it’s like to work in academia, CRM, and in tribal settings. Finally we talk about where he would love to see the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma’s THPO and Museum go in the future, as well as where he would like the field of anthropology to go.

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Archaeology Outreach in local Maya communities in the Yucatan - HeVo 26

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts Dr. Adolfo Iván Batún-Alpuche (Maya) Professor and Investigator at the Universidad del Oriente, Valladolid, Yucatán, and Dr. Khristin Landry-Montes, Project Facilitator and Affiliated Researcher with InHerit: Indigenous Heritage Passed to Present at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Drs. Batún and Landry-Montes have been working on archaeology outreach in local Maya communities in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico. They have been working with local middle school teachers to teach students about cenotes, underground freshwater aquifers, and their cultural, archaeological, and ecological importance. As one of my favorite part of this project, naturally, they are having students conduct oral history interviews with elders in their communities. Dr. Batún also shares about a previous community archaeology project that resulted not only in a community museum and heritage trail, but also reconnecting the community to their beekeeping heritage. In addition to their specific work in the Yucatán, we talk about what it’s like to be indigenous in Mexico and what it means to be “Maya”, still here, but not a stereotype or single entity

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Technology - HeVo 25

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts a panel on technology in the Heritage/Cultural Resource Management fields. Panelists include Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs, Emily Van Alst (Sihasapa Lakota descent), a PhD student at Indiana University, and Briece Edwards, Manager of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde. The panelists discuss how they use technology in their work, the positives and negatives of technology for tribes and heritage preservation, and tribes and Indigenous Archaeologist’s innovative adaptations of technology to serve their needs. They shared some especially exciting ways they are using technology to share information back to the communities they work with and as non-invasive or destructive alternatives.

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Museums, Representation, and Intersectionality - HeVo 24

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On today’s podcast we have Brandon Castle, a Senior in Fort Lewis College’s Anthropology Department, who has also worked at the Totem Heritage Center in Alaska, the Center of Southwest Studies in Colorado, the Field Museum of Natural History in Illinois, and the American Museum of Natural History in New York. He also discusses his work for Fort Lewis College’s Gender and Sexuality Resource Center. Brandon shares ideas on improving representation, intersectionality, collaboration, and the creation of safe spaces in anthropology and museums. We additionally talk about stereotyping and appropriation, including totems and two-spirit identities. Finally we take on how you experience identity differently in different settings and the balance between cultural relativism and pushing for culture change.

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Salish-Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation Program - HeVo 23

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On today’s podcast we have Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs. We talk about the blending of ethnography and archaeology within indigenous archaeology, as well as the identity challenges that many young Native Americans face and how indigenous archaeology can be one part of a holistic picture that can give young people a sense of who they are and hope for the future. He shares his experience working with National Geographic as one example of how photography and archaeology can reinstill that sense of identity.

“The application of oral histories to archaeology is at the forefront of the research, at no point is the narrative of tribal people secondary. This methodology is the foundation of our work. No longer should Indian people be delegated to the appendices. No longer are we ‘supplemental’ humans”.

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Greater Chaco Landscape - Heritage Voices 22

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On today’s podcast we are hugely honored to have three special guests who spoke with Jessica about the Greater Chaco Landscape during their advocacy trip to Washington D.C. The first segment features All Pueblo Council of Governors (APCG) Chairman Edward Paul Torres and former Governor of the Pueblo of Tesuque and co-chair of the APCG’s Natural Resources Committee, Mark Mitchell. In the second segment we have Keegan King, an advocate for the Greater Chaco Landscape from the Pueblo of Acoma. They speak about what Chaco means to them as individuals and to their Pueblos, how they would like to see the area managed, their local and national advocacy efforts, collaborating with the Navajo Nation on these efforts, and appropriate behavior at places like Chaco Canyon. Finally we talk about, what they would like to see in tribal consultation in general and specifically how you can support their efforts to protect the Greater Chaco Landscape.

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Food Sovereignty and Natives Outdoors - HeVo 21

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On today’s podcast we have Ashleigh Thompson (Miskwaagamiiwi-zaaga’igan- Red Lake Anishinaabe Nation), a fourth year PhD student at Jessica’s alma mater, the University of Arizona. She talks about how she came to anthropology and the importance of representation. We talk about food sovereignty and not oversimplifying the way we talk about people based on their food practices. We also go into what it’s like to reconnect with your culture and language as an adult and the importance of education both to have a larger impact and what it can teach you about yourself. Finally, we close out by hearing more about Natives Outdoors (a public benefit corporation trying to increase Native American representation in the recreation industry that gives 5% of the profits on their gear back to Native American run non-profits focusing on language & cultural preservation, outdoor recreation, and environmental issues), cultural appropriation, and how we can balance recreation, preservation, and being respectful at culturally important places.

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Seneca-Iroquois National Museum - HeVo 20

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On today’s podcast we speak with David L. George-Shongo, Jr., Acting Director of the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum. The Seneca-Iroquois National Museum just celebrated opening a brand new $18M facility, including a new museum/cultural center, archives, and decontamination area. Dave talks about the opening and the long process of developing the museum in the community (without bringing in any outside funding!). He also speaks about NAGPRA from the 1990s until now and working with other tribes to provide curation space if needed as well. He discusses the Men’s Cultural and Ritual Language Program and the importance of using Seneca words in explaining Seneca concepts in addition acting in a culturally appropriate manner while doing anthropology or heritage preservation. Mostly, he wants people to understand that the Seneca are people too and not only that they are still here even if they use modern tools, but that they will be here as Seneca into the future.

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Updates - HeVo 19.1

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On today’s podcast Lyle and I talk about what we’ve been up to for the past two years since we started working on the podcast. We talk about a few of our favorite past episodes and give a teaser for the upcoming episodes. We also talk a lot about the new non-profit that a group of us ethnographers have founded called Living Heritage Research Council and what we would like to do with it in the future. Also, we talk about the sweet logo that Lyle designed and how you can get your own swag with it on there (see the links below)!

LHRC collaborates with indigenous and local communities to preserve, interpret, and celebrate places that tell us who we are and where we come from. We focus on community-driven heritage research, outreach, and empowerment. We connect communities and policy makers to preserve culturally important landscapes and collective histories for future generations.

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Publishing - Heritage Voices 19

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On Today’s episode, Jessica hosts a panel focused on publishing. The panel includes Dr. Lisa Hardy (Editor of one of the Society for Applied Anthropology’s (SFAA) journals, Practicing Anthropology), Sarah Herr (Editor of one of the Society for American Archaeology’s (SAA) journals, Advances in Archaeological Practice), Dr. Kathleen Van Vlack (Editor of the High Plains Society for Applied Anthropology’s (HPSFAA) journal The Applied Anthropologist), and Dr. David Martinez (Akimel O’odham, Associate Professor of American Indian Studies at Arizona State University). Unfortunately, due to some last minute technical difficulties, Lyle was unable to join the call as co-host and panelist. Also, we actually recorded this episode back in March, so you may notice that things we mentioned happened awhile ago, so sorry about all that. We talked about everyone’s experience with publishing, tips for those who are interesting in publishing, challenges with diversity in publishing, and where they would like to see publishing going in the future. These amazing editors look forward to working with you towards publishing in their journals!

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Tribal Collaboration on the Lower Colorado River - HeVo 18

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What happens to a people when the river no longer flows to them? Or it flows, but no longer supports the associated plant and animal communities so important to their culture? What do they do about it? Today’s podcast features Nora McDowell, former Fort Mohave Indian Tribe Tribal Councilwoman and Jill McCormick, Historic Preservation Officer for the Quechan Tribe and the former Cultural Resources Manager and Archaeologist for the Cocopah Indian Tribe for 12 years. They talk about their collaborative efforts with other tribes in both the US and Mexico towards environmental, cultural, and spiritual restoration of the Lower Colorado River. We also talk about natural resources as cultural resources, improving tribal consultation and representation, and how to manage competing interests from various groups, as well as within a tribe.  

This episode is dedicated to Mr. Dale Phillips (1946 – 2016), Former Vice-Chairman, Cocopah Indian Tribe.  It was his concept, that is the basis for the creation of the Tribal River Vision project.  Mr. Phillips was a respected Tribal Leader, Bird Song singer, Spiritual and Cultural mentor who touched many lives both inside and outside of Indian Country.  His vision of a “Mighty Colorado River” that once again reached the delta was the inspiration of this work.  His love of both the cultural and natural world and the responsibilities of the Tribes to protect these entities are the guiding force for the vision of the future of the Colorado River.  We are honored to continue this work in his name and dedicated to seeing the Vision shared and realized.
— Ms. Nora McDowell and Ms. Jill McCormick

SAA2018 Wrap-Up - Heritage Voices 17

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Near the end of the 2018 Society for American Archaeology Conference held this year in Washington, D.C., host Jessica Yaquinto sat down with a few people in the APN mobile studio to talk about what they had presented, seen, and heard at the conference. 

Joining Jessica are, Kassie Rippee, Briece Edwards, Desiree Martinez, Wade Campbell, and Dorothy Lippert.

Live Panel on Bears Ears National Monument - Heritage Voices 15

On March 3rd, 2018 Lyle hosted a live panel on Bears Ears National Monument with indigenous activists at Friends of Cedar Mesa’s annual Celebrate Cedar Mesa event. In addition to Lyle himself, the panel also featured Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (former co-chair of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman and current Education Coordinator for the Ute Indian Museum), Ed Kabotie (Hopi/Tewa artist, musician, and activist) and Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi, Filmmaker and Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikeyah). The four talk about their experiences with Bears Ears National Monument, but also use the topic to discuss larger issues, including tribal sovereignty, indigenous and Western science collaborations, boarding schools, and how we can all be better activists. Their heartfelt words led to a standing ovation and an encore. Thank you again to Friends of Cedar Mesa and to all the panelists.

The time of the Indian expert is over. It’s time for expert Indians.
— Angelo Baca - Utah Dine Bikeyah

Nation-Building After Federal Recognition - Heritage Voices 14

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On today’s episode, Jessica speaks with Sandra Hernandez, Tribal Treasurer, and Colin Rambo, Cultural Resources Manager, of the Tejon Indian Tribe. We talk about their history, from having the first reservation in California to unknowingly losing all their land due to an unratified treaty to becoming the 566th federally recognized tribe through the reaffirmation process. They talk about what it’s like literally building a nation from scratch, in addition to revitalizing their language and culture. Finally they end out talking about their cultural preservation program and the curation facility that they built. This facility is now being used to fund their larger cultural goals. 
 

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Ethnography, Videography, and Public Anthropology - Heritage Voices 13

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On today’s episode, Jessica interviews Dr. Sean Gantt, Acting Director of Education for Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. He talks about his vision for education at Crow Canyon, the value of public anthropology, and what drew him to this type of work. Sean also talks about his work as a graduate student working for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. There he helped with the development of an interpretation plan for the Nanih Waiya cultural landscape, the Choctaw Mother Mound, which was transferred to the tribe from a state park. From there we discuss videography and ethnography, including the importance of community based and reciprocal methods. Finally we close out by talking about specific ways that anthropology can improve as a discipline, including the role of conferences, and specific actions individual anthropologists can take to make anthropology a safer space for indigenous people.

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Mashantucket Pequot - Heritage Voices 12

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On today’s episode, we host Marissa Turnbull and Michael Johnson, THPO and Deputy THPO of the Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation in Connecticut. Michael Johnson is also co-host of the Native Opinion Podcast. On this episode they talk about how their tribe went from very early colonization to only few families living on their state reservation in the 1970s to federal recognition and then to economic success that led to them being seen as a casino rather than a people. The Nation has found themselves in the middle of the debate on who is “a real Indian”. In 1993 Donald Trump argued before Congress that the Mashantucket Pequots should not have been given federal recognition and been able to become a gaming tribe because “they don’t look Indian”. We talk about what that’s been like for them as a tribe, but also how they would define their own narrative and the importance of education in doing that. Along those lines we talk about their history, their gardening and cultural education programs, and what they would like to achieve as a THPO, including seeking international repatriation of a wampum belt. 

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Hawaiian Heritage - Heritage Voices 11

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On today’s episode, Regina Keʻalapuaonālaniwikimekeānuenue Hilo takes us from digging up treasure in her backyard to her current work as a Burial Sites Specialist for the State Historic Preservation Division. We discuss the resurgence of Hawaiian language and culture and how she integrates her roles as an archaeologist, a student, and a state employee with her role as a Native Hawaiian. She discusses cultural protocols related to archaeology and burials, including larger cultural sensitivity and community collaboration. Finally Regina explains some of the differences between NAGPRA and the Hawaiian equivalent, as well as consultation with tribes vs. Native Hawaiian Organizations. Regina and I end out by briefly diving into the controversy with the proposed telescope on Mauna Kea.

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