pecos

0038 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Poster: Fuels Removal from Cultural Resources

“Thinning of a New Future: The Benefits of Removing Fuels from Cultural Resources in Santa Fe National Forest, Jemez Ranger District” By Rebecca Baisden, Stephanie Mack, Jason Millet, Carlyn Stewart, Kandi Voss, and Mary Allison Wolf

The buildup of fuels, such as tree branches, on archaeological sites is a major concern in the Jemez Ranger District of the Santa Fe National Forest due to the potential for wildfire in the area. Since 2013, the SW Jemez Mountain Landscape Restoration Project-Archaeological Site Thinning has endeavored to remove fuels from sites, creating a unique treatment plan to prevent damage to archaeological sites.

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0037 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Poster: Cedar Mesa Perishables with Erin Gearty

“The Cedar Mesa Perishables: Bringing New Life to a Forgotten Archaeological Collection” by Laurie Webster and Erin Gearty

Cedar Mesa, Utah, is an amazing landscape with a rich archaeological record. Excavations took place throughout the area, including in the dry caves in the Greater Cedar Mesa region. The Cedar Mesa Perishables Project set out to study 4,000 unpublished textiles, baskets, wooden implements, and hide and feather artifacts excavated during the 1890s. These artifacts are housed in six different museums! The overall goal of the project is to carefully document each artifact and make the collection more widely known to archaeologists, native communities, and the general public.

 

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0036 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Presentation: Landforms as Architecture

“Landforms as Architecture and the Appropriation of Place on Orayvi Wash, A.D. 550-800” by Kellam Throgmorton Binghamton University During a 2015 survey of Orayvi Wash, Arizona, two adjacent sequentially inhabited community centers were documented. The communities date between A.D. 550 and 800, the Basketmaker III and Pueblo I periods. The particularly unique aspect of these communities are the large buttes near the habitation area, which may have been seen as formalized ceremonial structures. On top of these landforms, post-and-adobe architecture was constructed, consequently manipulating the landscape into a power symbol. Consequently, we can see the creation of new power dynamics in early aggregated villages in this area. 

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0035 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Posters: Aztec North with Michelle Turner

“The Archaeology of Aztec North” by Michelle Turner, Maxwell Forton, Josh Jones, Randall McGuire, Lubna Omar, Kellam Throgmorton, Samuel Stansel, and Ruth Van Dyke Binghamton University The poster highlights testing conducted at the Aztec North great house (Aztec Ruins National Monument, NM) by a crew of archaeologists from Binghamton University. The project’s research questions, research design, and preliminary results of the excavation were discussed, including unexpected finds such as the presence of fish bones in a burnt floor feature. The authors offer some insight into how Aztec North—and cultural landscape—relates to Chaco Canyon. Turner is studying the ceramics recovered from the excavation for her dissertation! *Please note: The poster session was absolutely packed, so the background noise on the recording is quite loud.

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0034 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Posters: The Moon, Shrines, and Chaco with Robert Weiner

“An Investigation into Possible Lunar Alignments of Prehistoric Shrine-Sites at Chaco Canyon” by Anna Sofaer, William Stone, and Robert Weiner The Solstice Project and Brown University There are more than enormous pueblos and beautiful artifacts at the Chaco Culture National Historical Park in New Mexico. There are also a number of C-shaped, circular, and cairn masonry structures situated on elevated positions near and throughout Chaco Canyon. These structures appear to have been intentionally interrelated on alignments to the major standstill moon. Since there are deposits of turquoise and other artifacts at these structures, it’s thought that they may be shrines. Consequently, the shrines suggest a level of lunar astronomical expression in Chaco culture through architectural alignments. *Please note: The poster session was absolutely packed, so the background noise on the recording is quite loud

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0033 - Pecos 2016 - Pecos Posters: College vs. The Work Force

“College Vs. The Work Force” By Alyssa Colan and Vincent Gentile The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests Are college graduates ready to work in the field of archaeology? Were they adequately prepared to survey, write reports, and dig shovel tests? Colan and Gentile explore these questions, focusing on whether or not the skills taught while obtaining a bachelor’s degree are applicable to the working world. The majority of the material taught prepares students for academia, not necessarily for working in cultural resource management. The poster highlights the skills not typically taught in the majority of undergraduate programs, including personal anecdotes, as well as suggestions for improving said programs to better prepare students.

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Conference Host: Emily Long - TrowelTalesPodcast@gmail.com

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0032 - Pecos 2016 - The Pecos Experience

The Pecos Conference, created in 1927, is an outdoor extravaganza of presentations and posters highlighting current research in southwestern archaeology. Archaeologists descend on the chosen location for the year, camping together, sharing research and stories, and carousing for a couple of days. This year the Pecos Conference took place in Alpine, AZ, hosted by the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests.

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Conference Host: Emily Long - TrowelTalesPodcast@gmail.com

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