archaeology

Ethnography with African Descendent Communities - Episode 16

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Today’s podcast features Dr. Antoinette Jackson, Associate Professor at the University of South Florida. We talk about her work with the Gullah Geechee and the importance of representation in telling people’s stories. We contrast their experience with her work with the local communities in the U.S. Virgin Islands and the National Park Service. She talks about how to work with descendent communities with less formalized power structures, as well as how to work more ethically with descendant communities in general. Finally, we talk about the town of Archery, which provides an interesting juxtaposition of how stories are told, being both a predominately African-American community and the boyhood home of former President Jimmy Carter. Finally, she shares what it’s like interviewing a former President!  

Present Pasts Call for Papers (PDF)

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Live Panel on Bears Ears National Monument - Episode 15

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On March 3rd, 2018 Lyle hosted a live panel on Bears Ears National Monument with indigenous activists at Friends of Cedar Mesa’s annual Celebrate Cedar Mesa event. In addition to Lyle himself, the panel also featured Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (former co-chair of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman and current Education Coordinator for the Ute Indian Museum), Ed Kabotie (Hopi/Tewa artist, musician, and activist) and Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi, Filmmaker and Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikeyah). The four talk about their experiences with Bears Ears National Monument, but also use the topic to discuss larger issues, including tribal sovereignty, indigenous and Western science collaborations, boarding schools, and how we can all be better activists. Their heartfelt words led to a standing ovation and an encore. Thank you again to Friends of Cedar Mesa and to all the panelists.

The time of the Indian expert is over. It’s time for expert Indians.
— Angelo Baca - Utah Dine Bikeyah
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Nation-Building After Federal Recognition - Episode 14

Trival Views of History, Anthropology and Archaeology

On today’s episode, Jessica speaks with Sandra Hernandez, Tribal Treasurer, and Colin Rambo, Cultural Resources Manager, of the Tejon Indian Tribe. We talk about their history, from having the first reservation in California to unknowingly losing all their land due to an unratified treaty to becoming the 566th federally recognized tribe through the reaffirmation process. They talk about what it’s like literally building a nation from scratch, in addition to revitalizing their language and culture. Finally they end out talking about their cultural preservation program and the curation facility that they built. This facility is now being used to fund their larger cultural goals. 
 

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A Hopi perspective on Diversity in Anthropology and Grand Canyon- Episode 2

This episode is part two of the Grand Canyon National Park miniseries. Today we interview Heritage Voices co-host Lyle Balenquah, Hopi archaeologist, ethnographer, educator, advocate, and river guide extraordinaire about his background, diversity in Anthropology, and Hopi connections to the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon topics include the proposed Greater Grand Canyon National Monument, the Desert View Watchtower project, river running, and diversity in interpretation.

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Jessica
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org
Twitter: @livingheritageA
Lyle:
Email: Lyle.Balenquah@gmail.com
Twitter: @LyleBalenquah

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