heritage

Technology - Episode 25

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On today’s podcast Jessica hosts a panel on technology in the Heritage/Cultural Resource Management fields. Panelists include Aaron Brien (Apsáalooke), a member of the Night Hawk Dance Society and faculty in Salish Kootenai College’s Tribal Historic Preservation and Native American Studies programs, Emily Van Alst (Sihasapa Lakota descent), a PhD student at Indiana University, and Briece Edwards, Manager of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office of the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde. The panelists discuss how they use technology in their work, the positives and negatives of technology for tribes and heritage preservation, and tribes and Indigenous Archaeologist’s innovative adaptations of technology to serve their needs. They shared some especially exciting ways they are using technology to share information back to the communities they work with and as non-invasive or destructive alternatives.

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Seneca-Iroquois National Museum - Episode 20

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On today’s podcast we speak with David L. George-Shongo, Jr., Acting Director of the Seneca-Iroquois National Museum. The Seneca-Iroquois National Museum just celebrated opening a brand new $18M facility, including a new museum/cultural center, archives, and decontamination area. Dave talks about the opening and the long process of developing the museum in the community (without bringing in any outside funding!). He also speaks about NAGPRA from the 1990s until now and working with other tribes to provide curation space if needed as well. He discusses the Men’s Cultural and Ritual Language Program and the importance of using Seneca words in explaining Seneca concepts in addition acting in a culturally appropriate manner while doing anthropology or heritage preservation. Mostly, he wants people to understand that the Seneca are people too and not only that they are still here even if they use modern tools, but that they will be here as Seneca into the future.

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Live Panel on Bears Ears National Monument - Episode 15

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On March 3rd, 2018 Lyle hosted a live panel on Bears Ears National Monument with indigenous activists at Friends of Cedar Mesa’s annual Celebrate Cedar Mesa event. In addition to Lyle himself, the panel also featured Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk (former co-chair of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition and Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Councilwoman and current Education Coordinator for the Ute Indian Museum), Ed Kabotie (Hopi/Tewa artist, musician, and activist) and Angelo Baca (Diné/Hopi, Filmmaker and Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikeyah). The four talk about their experiences with Bears Ears National Monument, but also use the topic to discuss larger issues, including tribal sovereignty, indigenous and Western science collaborations, boarding schools, and how we can all be better activists. Their heartfelt words led to a standing ovation and an encore. Thank you again to Friends of Cedar Mesa and to all the panelists.

The time of the Indian expert is over. It’s time for expert Indians.
— Angelo Baca - Utah Dine Bikeyah
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Hawaiian Heritage - Episode 11

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On today’s episode, Regina Keʻalapuaonālaniwikimekeānuenue Hilo takes us from digging up treasure in her backyard to her current work as a Burial Sites Specialist for the State Historic Preservation Division. We discuss the resurgence of Hawaiian language and culture and how she integrates her roles as an archaeologist, a student, and a state employee with her role as a Native Hawaiian. She discusses cultural protocols related to archaeology and burials, including larger cultural sensitivity and community collaboration. Finally Regina explains some of the differences between NAGPRA and the Hawaiian equivalent, as well as consultation with tribes vs. Native Hawaiian Organizations. Regina and I end out by briefly diving into the controversy with the proposed telescope on Mauna Kea.

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Protecting Marshall Island's Heritage in the Face of Climate Change - Episode 4.1

This episode is a follow up to the previous episode (episode 4) with Tina Stege about climate change in the Marshall Islands. This episode features both Tina Stege, Marshallese Anthropologist, and Jenny Newell, Collection Co-Manager at the Australian Museum, Sydney. The two talk about how museums can bring collections to life for associated communities, their collaborative ethnographic project looking at adaptions to climate change in the Marshall Islands, international repatriation vs. NAGPRA, as well as what role museums play related to climate change. We discuss questions such as “How can museums help preserve culture and help people adapt as homelands sink underwater?” and “what happens to sovereign governments as they no longer have a place to govern over”?

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Jessica Yaquinto
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org 
Twitter (@livingheritageA)

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