indigenous

Reclaiming Indigenous Histories and the Indigenous Paleolithic - Ep31

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On today’s episode Jessica hosts Dr. Paulette Steeves (Cree-Metis), Associate Professor at Algoma University. We especially focus on the Indigenous paleolithic and how Dr. Steeves is showing that it was very different than how it is presented by the field of archaeology. We also talk about the Bering Strait theory and why the academy is so resistant to that narrative being challenged. In the beginning of the episode Dr. Steeves walks us through her career, including some incidents that were not so flattering for the field, and finish our by talking about what it would take to decolonize the academy and anthropology.

"In early February 1999 I was standing on the corner outside of an old brick building which housed my favorite used bookstore in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The store, which was situated on the edge campus and the entrance to Main Street was a magical place of dreams and respite, where I went for brief sojourns from the real world. The store also contained glassed in shelves with a wonderful collection of nickel candies, from which I created magical brown paper sacks of joy and happiness for my three children. As I exited the book store my oldest son Jesse who was 21, ran up to me, and smiled an accepted his bag of candy. He looked me in the eyes and thanked me and hugged me then just out of the blue he said; “no matter what ever happens to me, don’t you ever give up on your education, promise me you will never give, you will keep going and finish you bachelors and go on to a higher degree, be a doctor, be a lawyer, keep going, promise me you will never give up”, so that day in early February I promised him, I would never give up. Just a week later he was gone, crossed over from this world, and my promise to my son to never give up was the last conversation we had. This story is dedicated to my oldest son Jesse Blue Steeves Dec1, 1977-Feb 18, 1999, I can tell him now that thanks to his love and foresight, I never gave up."

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International Indigenous Archaeology, NAGPRA, and the Northern Plains - Episode 6

Today’s episode features Emily Van Alst, Sihasapa Lakota descent, talking about indigenous and community based archaeology in Japan, Peru, Spain, and Alaska. She also talks about NAGPRA from museum, international, and indigenous perspectives. Finally we talk about how archaeology can be used to benefit indigenous communities and vice versa. Emily specifically discusses zooarchaeology and rock art as areas that are fruitful for indigenous archaeology, especially in the work she would like to pursue in the Northern Plains in her upcoming PhD program at Indiana University where she will be working with Learning NAGPRA.

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Protecting Marshall Island's Heritage in the Face of Climate Change - Episode 4.1

This episode is a follow up to the previous episode (episode 4) with Tina Stege about climate change in the Marshall Islands. This episode features both Tina Stege, Marshallese Anthropologist, and Jenny Newell, Collection Co-Manager at the Australian Museum, Sydney. The two talk about how museums can bring collections to life for associated communities, their collaborative ethnographic project looking at adaptions to climate change in the Marshall Islands, international repatriation vs. NAGPRA, as well as what role museums play related to climate change. We discuss questions such as “How can museums help preserve culture and help people adapt as homelands sink underwater?” and “what happens to sovereign governments as they no longer have a place to govern over”?

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Jessica Yaquinto
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org 
Twitter (@livingheritageA)

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Diné Public, Fire, and Indigenous Archaeology - Episode 3

In this episode, we talk to Diné (Navajo) archaeologist, Jason Nez. He talks about being Diné and an archaeologist, challenges he faces as a Native American archaeologist, and how the way archaeology is presented (aliens!) can either empower or belittle tribes. He talks about his work educating both Diné youth and the general public about archaeology and Native American perspectives and why that is important. Finally, he highlights his experiences across the country as a fire archaeologist, including what that looks like, looting concerns, and learning from other tribes about their different cultural resources.

Contact:

Jessica Yaquinto jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org; Twitter (@livingheritageA

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A Hopi perspective on Diversity in Anthropology and Grand Canyon- Episode 2

This episode is part two of the Grand Canyon National Park miniseries. Today we interview Heritage Voices co-host Lyle Balenquah, Hopi archaeologist, ethnographer, educator, advocate, and river guide extraordinaire about his background, diversity in Anthropology, and Hopi connections to the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon topics include the proposed Greater Grand Canyon National Monument, the Desert View Watchtower project, river running, and diversity in interpretation.

LINKS:

Contact:

Jessica
Email: jessica@livingheritageanthropology.org
Twitter: @livingheritageA
Lyle:
Email: Lyle.Balenquah@gmail.com
Twitter: @LyleBalenquah

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