nagpra

Hawaiian Heritage - Episode 11

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On today’s episode, Regina Keʻalapuaonālaniwikimekeānuenue Hilo takes us from digging up treasure in her backyard to her current work as a Burial Sites Specialist for the State Historic Preservation Division. We discuss the resurgence of Hawaiian language and culture and how she integrates her roles as an archaeologist, a student, and a state employee with her role as a Native Hawaiian. She discusses cultural protocols related to archaeology and burials, including larger cultural sensitivity and community collaboration. Finally Regina explains some of the differences between NAGPRA and the Hawaiian equivalent, as well as consultation with tribes vs. Native Hawaiian Organizations. Regina and I end out by briefly diving into the controversy with the proposed telescope on Mauna Kea.

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Working with Museums Panel - Episode 9

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We are excited to share our first panel episode with you. In addition to being a panel episode, this episode is also a crossover episode with the Go Dig a Hole podcast. Today’s panel features indigenous archaeologists, cultural anthropologists, and even a THPO from the Southwest, California, Pacific Northwest, and Plains tribes talking about their experiences working with museums. They talk about the major challenges they face with museums, including representation, repatriation, and past preservation techniques, as well as positive museum experiences and the directions they would like to see museums go in the future. Finally they give guidance on how museums and tribes can better work together in the future. 

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International Indigenous Archaeology, NAGPRA, and the Northern Plains - Episode 6

Today’s episode features Emily Van Alst, Sihasapa Lakota descent, talking about indigenous and community based archaeology in Japan, Peru, Spain, and Alaska. She also talks about NAGPRA from museum, international, and indigenous perspectives. Finally we talk about how archaeology can be used to benefit indigenous communities and vice versa. Emily specifically discusses zooarchaeology and rock art as areas that are fruitful for indigenous archaeology, especially in the work she would like to pursue in the Northern Plains in her upcoming PhD program at Indiana University where she will be working with Learning NAGPRA.

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